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Easter braised lamb

Easter braised lamb

Spring lamb is such an evocative Easter tradition but a roast joint can be expensive, and too much to handle if your appetite is low or you have trouble chewing and swallowing. Instead, try this slow-cooked, tender and affordable alternative that tastes special enough for an Easter feast for all the family.


Serves 4
Preparation Time: 30 minutes
Cooking Time: 2 hours

Ingredients

4 large lamb neck fillets

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Extra virgin olive oil

1 large carrot, diced

1 stick celery, diced

1 onion, diced

5 cloves garlic, chopped

250ml red wine

120ml red wine vinegar

2 cans chopped tomatoes

500ml chicken stock

4 sprigs fresh thyme

4 sprigs rosemary

Mashed potato, spring greens and carrots, to serve


Method

Preheat the oven to 170°C.

Season the lamb with salt and pepper.

Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a casserole, add the lamb slices in a single layer and brown on both sides. Set the lamb aside.

Add another tablespoon of oil to the pan and sauté the carrot, celery, onion and garlic over a medium heat for 6 to 8 minutes, until softened.

Add the red wine and red wine vinegar to the vegetables and continue cooking until the liquid is reduced by half, stirring regularly and scraping any sticky bits from the base of the pan.

Add the tomatoes, chicken stock and herbs, then return the lamb to the pot. Bring the liquid to the boil, then cover the casserole and transfer it to the oven for around 2 hours. Turn the lamb slices halfway through cooking.

When the lamb is very tender and falling off the bone, remove it from the cooking liquid. Strain the liquid to remove the herbs and cooked vegetables, then simmer it in a saucepan until it thickens to a rich sauce. Check the seasoning.

Flake the lamb away from the bone and serve on soft mashed potato with spring greens and carrots, with the sauce poured over or served in a jug on the side.

Picture by Jo Del Corro



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